Expecting the Unexpected: A Review of The Hobbit, An Unexpected Journey

Freak of Nature

The Hobbit - An Unexpected Journey - Martin Freeman Going Outside

There have been a lot of reviews already about The Hobbit, I know this because my dad sent me a ton of them. Nearly all of them were mixed reviews but after reading all of them and being pestered about how different this movie was going to be and how many critics hadn’t liked it I threw up my hands in frustration. I said “You know what? The only review that matters is mine”, now I’m not saying that in all of the internet the only opinion that counts for anything is mine (I’m not that egocentric) what I’m saying is that I wasn’t going to be pushed around and my viewpoint changed just by what some critic said. I’m going to watch it for myself and then make my own opinion, only then will I have a review that I feel is accurate. I suggest that anyone who…

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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Review

R. Tyler Horner

Ok, I’ll admit it.  I’m a Tolkien guy, but I wasn’t always one.  I read The Fellowship of the Ring about a week before seeing the first movie and really hadn’t ever considered reading it before then.  I found that book good, but oddly slow moving so when I went to see the movie I had rather meager expectations.  Then I sat in a San Antonio, TX movie theater and watched one of the most awe-inspiring movies I had seen.  The book literally came to life (with a few things left out and the end of the movie being a chapter into The Two Towers, but I digress) and it made me want to read the other two as well as The Hobbit again every time a new movie in the series came out.  I’ll admit that I’m not the quintessential Tolkien fan because the movies drove my desire to read…

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Swords Story – Sting ( Lord of the Rings)

Sting was an Elvish long knife made in Gondolin during the First Age.

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History

Sting was an ancient blade and was lost during the Fall of Gondolin, the same battle in which Turgon fell and Glamdring was taken.

The blade was carried by Bilbo in The Hobbit after he found it in a Troll-hoard. Sting was found alongside Glamdring and Orcrist. Though just a knife by the standard of elves, it made a perfect short sword for a Hobbit. A typical Gondolin weapon, it glowed blue whenever Orcs/Goblins were close by. It was christened Sting by the spiders of Mirkwood Forest, many of whom were “stung” by Bilbo with it.

Just before his nephew left on his quest to Mordor, Bilbo gave Sting to Frodo.Sam then took the weapon from his (seemingly dead) master and used it to good effect against Shelob on the borders of Mordor. After the defeat of Sauronat the end of the Third Age, Frodo entrusted Sting to Sam and it became an heirloom of the Gamgee family.

Gollum, who disliked anything made by the elves, was afraid of Sting. This fear aided Bilbo when he confronted Gollum in a cave at the base of the Misty Mountains in The Hobbit (the book). It also helped Frodo and Sam subdue Gollum in The Lord of the Rings. Orcs also had an instinctive fear of these weapons and hated any who carried them.

As is fitting for a blade of Gondolin, Sting could easily cut through the webs of the offspring of Ungoliant, including the spiders of Mirkwood and the evil Shelob herself.

The only way to explain the sword’s survival through the War of Wrath is that the sword somehow was taken out of Beleriand within the 43 years after Gondolin’s fall and before the end of the First Age. This was most likely accomplished by one of the flightless dragons involved in Gondolin’s fall, most probably the dragon later to be known as Scatha the Worm. After fleeing east with the spoils of Gondolin, including Glamdring, Orcrist, and Sting, Scatha established a lair on the southern slopes of Grey Mountains (Ered Mithrin). Roughly around 2000 of the third age, Scatha was killed by Rohirrim leader Fram but the hoard was disputed by the dwarves (it undoubtedly did contain many dwarven treasures as well, like the horn gifted to Meriadoc by Eowyn). The dwarves killed Fram and made off with some of the hoard most likely including the swords of Gondolin. The swords would have been used 700 years later in the battles between the dwarves and the orcs revenging the death of Thror and culminating in the Battle of Nanduhirion (where young Thorin Oakenshield earned his name). Thus the orcs would have a fresh fear of Biter and Beater (as demonstrated by their reactions when they capture Bilbo and company). Years after the battle, the dwarven wielders of the Elvish swords were most likely relocating to Lindon during the Fell Winter of 2911 when they were waylaid unsuspectingly by trolls in the Ettenmoors. Thus the swords ultimately fell into the hands of the three trolls from The Hobbit by the end of the Third Age

Swords Story – Andúril ( Lord of the Rings)

The sword of Elendil was forged anew by Elvish smiths, and on its blade was traced a device of seven stars set between the crescent Moon and the rayed Sun, and about them was written many runes; for Aragorn, son ofArathorn was going to war upon the marches of Mordor. Very bright was that sword when it was made whole again; the light of the sun shone redly in it, and the light of the moon shone cold, and its edge was hard and keen. And Aragorn gave it a new name and called it Andúril, Flame of the West.
—The Fellowship of the Ring, The Ring Goes South

In TA 3019 the sword Narsil was reforged in Rivendell as Andúril also known as Sword that was Broken and Sword Reforged for Aragorn, the Heir of Isildur, and rightful King of Gondor.

Anduril2.jpg

Aragorn carried the sword during his journey south as part of the Fellowship of the Ring, and it featured prominently at several points in the story, where it was sometimes referred to as the Sword that was Broken or The Sword Reforged. Aragorn uses it as evidence of his heritage when he, Legolas, and Gimli first meet Éomer. He reluctantly sets it aside before meeting Théoden; telling Háma, that death will come to any man except himself who draws it from its scabbard. The Elves of Lothlórien made a scabbard specifically for this sword. It was overlaid with a tracery of flowers and leaves and elven runes spelling out the name of the sword and its lineage. There was an enchantment upon the scabbard so that the blade that was drawn from it would not be stained or broken, even in defeat.

It is likely that Aragorn could have killed the Nazgul with Anduril, even though he was a man, due to the sword’s use in cutting the ring of Sauron’s finger.